Doctors Notes: AVOID procrastination—

The tendency to procrastinate over dieting can be quite a plague.

It is likely that if you are procrastinating over your diet you are familiar with how procrastination plays a role in other aspects of your life. Procrastination can make you feel defeated, unmotivated and guilty. None of these emotions will help with your weight-loss efforts. Considerations for diet and procrastination include the diet, your weight, your dieting history and your diet and weight loss goals.

Procrastination

Take the time to reflect on your history of procrastination; most likely you will find a pattern. Procrastination usually is a response to stress, dread, fear of failure, feeling overwhelmed or a lack of motivation. Your diet and weight loss goals might be a contributor to these responses. Perhaps your diet is too extreme for you to be successful or maybe you are dreading giving up your favorite desserts. Increasing your awareness to these factors is a way to help conquer them.

Goals

Consider the goals you have for this diet. Perhaps you do not even realize some of the ways in which these goals are more like hopes, dreams and fantasies. If you are procrastinating over a diet, it is highly likely that your goals are inappropriate or absent. Examples of inappropriate diet goals include highly restricted eating, abrupt changes to diet, rapid weight loss or a brand new self-esteem.

Addressing Procrastination

Providing a structure through goal setting is a helpful way to address procrastination. Setting diet goals provides a structure and framework for something intimidating, frustrating or new. You might realize by now that you either need to set some goals or your current goals need revising. University of New Hampshire psychologists support the idea that setting goals provides you with clarity on such hurdles. Keep goals realistic, attainable, concrete and measurable.

Other Considerations

Upon redirecting your diet goals, procrastination should alleviate but you may still have few more hurdles. Be patient. Take note and reward yourself for small accomplishments. If you find that you continue to procrastinate, you may wish to seek the support of a nutritionist or psychologist who can more closely examine the dynamic between diet and procrastination. Always consult a physician before making any great changes to diet or exercise.

This entry was posted in Weight Loss.